Posted by: Robert Palmer | February 26, 2012

Awareness of Need vs Want

Separating want from need involves awareness. Want focuses on you. Even if you give time, $, or whatever-who is the focus? We “want” is our focus-this is the root cause of suffering in relationships (personal or business). This is why leaders struggle as well. Are you aware of how focused you are on what you “want?”

20120226-111008.jpg

Posted by: Robert Palmer | January 1, 2012

Awareness: Defined, Part 1

Awareness is a critical concept in understanding yourself and of course it’s a difficult concept to understand. However, a better understanding of this concept helps us to understand who we are (potential) and what we are capable of doing (competence). Awareness is based on knowledge attained through perception or information that you receive from external and internal sources. These sources are the foundation of influences to our thinking, choices and decisions in our relationships and careers. Ultimately these influences play a significant role in our quality of life. Your level of awareness is affected by your conscious recognition of what is going on around you and what is happening to you.

Posted by: Robert Palmer | January 1, 2012

Awareness: Defined

Awareness is a critical concept in understanding yourself and of course it’s a difficult concept to understand. However, a better understanding of this concept helps us to understand who we are (potential) and what we are capable of doing (competence). Awareness is based on knowledge attained through perception or information that you receive from external and internal sources. These sources are the foundation of influences to our thinking, choices and decisions in our relationships and careers. Ultimately these influences play a significant role in our quality of life. Your level of awareness is affected by your conscious recognition of what is going on around you and what is happening to you.

Posted by: Robert Palmer | March 22, 2011

Wanting a Door to Close

I’ve heard it said that when one door closes another one opens. That’s a scary yet hopeful thought for those who’ve lost their jobs in the past year. I wonder about all those folks who are working in jobs that they don’t like? Would it be possible to close a door in order to open another one? There are lots of books out there on opening your own door, building your own door, decorating your own door, but enough about the door! Everyone wants a door to open-it’s polite, civilized, mannerly, and it’s how it should be done. But the one key step to getting a door opened is to knock. If you want to try a new door or you need a new door to open then start knocking! Don’t get discouraged, don’t think, don’t hesitate, just start knocking. When a door opens (remember how this feels) be gracious, be professional, be your best. A door will open and you will be welcomed in.

Posted by: Robert Palmer | March 13, 2011

The Rhythm of Success

Rhythm is a powerful force. It’s defined as the movement or variation characterized by the regular recurrence or alternation of different quantities or conditions (dictionary.com). Success is often referred to as a journey, and that journey has a rhythm. Working with rhythm or in rhythm requires strength and energy. Harnessing this rhythm is not really possible. The best we can do is to navigate the rhythm in our lives. Navigating requires a few tools. You need a vision (what do you want?), a purpose (why do you want?), and a clear goal (what you need to do?). If you’re not careful you’ll lose your direction, and then you’re at the mercy of that rhythm-a powerful force.The Rhythm of Success

Posted by: Robert Palmer | March 5, 2011

Adversity Requires Renewal

We have all experienced adversity. That state, condition, or instance of serious or continued difficulty. Adversity is never easy and rarely fun. I have found that when facing adversity in the workplace, it’s time to renew your efforts and focus on your work. To renew is to restore freshness or vigor. It’s also about focusing on doing good work. Deliver the best product/service possible in the face of adversity. It is during this time that the insights gained and the lessons learned are the most valuable. Victory will be that much sweeter.

Posted by: Robert Palmer | March 1, 2011

Six Types of Listening

Being a good listener is an elusive skill. It’s also becoming a more critical skill to business, career, and
personal success. Over the years of working with leaders I have identified different types of listening.
Some of them are obvious, but others might help take you to the next level. Here are six types of
listening you can practice:
1. Internal—listening to your own inner voice and the thoughts in your mind.
2. Passive—hearing things around you that your ear picks up on.
3. Active—engaging with the person speaking by asking questions, or responding with eye contact
and nods of the head.
4. Selective—tuning in to what you “want” or “need” to know only.
5. Empathetic—sharing in the actual feelings or experiences of what someone else is feeling or
experiencing.
6. Transformational—actively searching for solutions in what you are hearing in order to help a
person or group by providing a solution.Six Types of Listening

Posted by: Robert Palmer | February 4, 2011

Four Types of Attraction in Relationships

There are four types of attraction used in all relationships. The first is ALLUREMENT-those who you are phyically attracted. PROXIMITY-those who you are naturally close to. EXPOSURE-those whom we are forced to be around. SIMILARITY-those whom we share interests, values, attitudes, and personality traits.

By the way like attracts like, while opposites interest us.

Posted by: Robert Palmer | February 4, 2011

Seven Effective Relationship Initiation Skills

There are seven skills needed to initiate any type or level of relationships. The more of them you know the better you will be at initiating a relationship. 1. find commonalities, it doesn’t matter what you find in common for most people, but other folks are not impressed that your from Florida as well. Sometimes you have to find something more interesting. 2. Involvement, doing similar things is always interesting on a perspective level. For example, “how did you approach writing your book?” 3. Listening, there are several levels of listening (hearing, comprehending, active, empathetic, transformational, etc.) and you have to engage at the appropriate leve. 4. Politeness, don’t jump in or cut people off, or worse “I couldn’t help overhear you…” LOSER! Be unselfish and not make it all about you. 5. Give approval, offer compliments, be nice, provide affirmation, and be sincere about it. 6. Give encouragement, always find a particular aspect to encourage as it shows an expression of interest in that person. 7. Be positive, stay away from all negativity. Don’t get to deep and keep a broad perspective. Stay shallow on a subject and stay positive. It’s more fun

Posted by: Robert Palmer | December 5, 2010

Desire

Desire is the seed of all achievement.

Older Posts »

Categories

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.